Buying a House: Working With a Real Estate Agent to Make an Offer

When making an offer, a real estate agent brings some pretty powerful assets to the table: market knowledge, objectivity and (hopefully) some well-honed negotiating skills. Buying a house is emotional, and your agent can help level the field by bringing a more rational approach to the transaction. Here’s how the two of you can work together to get the best possible deal.

Don’t ignore the market

When it comes to making an offer, it’s more important than ever to consider a home’s value — which might not be the same as its listing price. Carefully study the comparative market analysis provided by your real estate agent. When researching the home and neighborhood’s value online, compare the estimates provided by Zillow, Trulia and Redfin, which can range widely.

Your agent will help you interpret the data and establish a fair offer price.

Work with a Real Estate Agent to Make an Offer

Staying sane in a seller’s market

If you’re buying a house in a hot market, it’s easy to get caught up in auction fever. Your agent can help keep you focused only on what you can control. If a number of buyers are interested in the same home, make your first bid your best offer.

If you’re really motivated to buy a particular property, consider putting together two or more offers in advance. That way, if there are no competing offers, your agent can submit the lowest. The higher offers can be the go-to bids if there’s a crowded field.

Find out why the seller is moving

The seller usually wants to sell as much as, if not more than, you want to buy. He has just one house to sell; you have a market full of opportunities. Of course, this is less of a factor in a strong seller’s market where inventory is low. But if the seller has already signed a contract on his next home, or if there’s a divorce in the mix or a job relocation timetable in play, that’s all good information to have. Have your real estate agent do as much recon as possible.

Keep the contingencies in check

In competitive real estate markets, contingencies can be deal killers. When it comes to conditions, get creative. Forget the little stuff and concentrate on major issues that must be addressed — and offer alternatives.

For example, if an inspection reveals necessary repairs, ask for a credit adjustment to be applied at closing, rather than putting the onus of contracting and completing the repair work on the owner. Anything you can do to ease the sales process and shorten the time to loan closing may work in your favor.

Make sure your agent is a strong advocate

Ideally, your buyer’s agent is both a master negotiator and your biggest advocate. For sellers, it’s not always just about the money. If your agent is singing your praises (you’re preapproved, love the neighborhood, offering a bigger down payment), you might score the edge in what would have been a tie. Personalities play a part in any human interaction.

How a seller is treated — and how a buyer is represented — can often make or break a real estate deal. Make sure your agent is at least pretending to be your biggest fan.

If it’s a no, move on

Having a deal go south on you is going to hurt. You can wallow in your disappointment for as long as you want, or for about an hour — whichever comes first. Think of it this way: You’re not starting over; you’ve already eliminated a lot of the variables. You know how this whole thing works now. It’s just a matter of finding the right house.

But first, if you lost in a multiple-offer situation, see if your agent can get your bid in a backup position. Deals fall through, and if the accepted offer does crater — because of a loan snag, a broken contingency, whatever — you might be in a prime position to rescue a sale.

In the meantime, in addition to revisiting your house runners-up, consider asking your real estate agent to gather up some older or expired listings. Many buyers neglect this segment of the market. If a house has been on the market for a while without selling, you’ve got some leverage, perhaps even a motivated seller.Find the Best Real Estate Agent

Getting the deal done

Congratulations! You finally have a signed contract in hand and can almost smell the green grass (desert blooms, pine-covered mountains, salty sea air — fumes of rush-hour traffic?) of your new neighborhood. You’re like a long-distance runner stretching for the finish-line tape. It’s time to move from deal making to loan closing.

Hal Bundrick is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: hal@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @halmbundrick

This article originally appeared on NerdWallet.


Mortgage Pre-Qualification

A photo of happy expecting couple using digital tablet on sofa. Loving young partners surfing internet at home. Both are wearing casuals in brightly lit room.

Getting a mortgage pre-qualification is important in today’s competitive market. It’s almost a necessity when you’re ready to place a serious offer on a house. For most homebuyers, this is the first step in the home buying process.

Why should I get pre-qualified?

Pre-qualification letters show the amount you’ve been pre-qualified for and are based on your current credit history, income, assets and debt. However, pre-qualifications do not go through a full underwriting review by the lender, so it’s not a commitment to provide you a home loan. 

What information do I need to provide to get pre-qualified?

Since your lender will need to review your financial situation, you’ll need to provide some information and documentation. You could be asked for:

  • Social Security Number
  • Employment history (minimum of 2 years)
  • 2 most recent paystubs (to verify proof of income)
  • Tax documents
  • Bank account information (account numbers, statements)

Is there something that could make my offer more competitive?

A pre-qualification is a great way to show sellers that you are serious about your offer. The HUNT Mortgage Pre-Purchase Commitment Program is an even better way. The HUNT Mortgage Pre-Purchase Commitment Program delivers a fully underwritten commitment, subject only to collateral conditions and to reassure sellers, HUNT Mortgage backs its commitment with a $1,000 guarantee*. If a buyer does not close on a transaction due to the buyer’s mortgage application failing, we will pay the seller $1,000. The guarantee distinguishes HUNT customers from other buyers a seller may be considering.

Contact HUNT Mortgage (link to contact page) or call 888.433.8373 to discover how you can apply for your own no-cost, no-obligation Pre-Purchase Commitment that gives you a competitive advantage when you shop for a home. By getting a commitment for your financing upfront, you can truly enjoy the process of shopping for your dream home.

Disclaimer: *The guaranty is null and void if:  a) The property is not deemed acceptable collateral for the loan due to value and or condition; b) The buyer or seller willfully cancels the transaction; c) The buyer voluntarily terminates employment and or voluntarily divests assets prior to closing; d) The buyer takes out new credit after the Pre-Purchase Commitment is issued; e) The seller is unable to deliver clear acceptable title;  f) Guaranty is only on owner occupied single family transactions; g) The transaction does not close due to a contract contingency not being met other than the mortgage financing; h) Pre-Purchase Commitment was issued with maximum specific sale price and taxes, guaranty is void if either of these are exceeded; i) The contract closing is dated past the expiration of the Pre-Purchase Commitment. Guaranty is only on Pre-Purchase Commitments issued by HUNT Mortgage


Buying a Home in The Winter

Roof with brick fence covered in snowflakes

Ready to get a jump on the spring market? Look for your new home now during the winter months. Buying a home when the snow is falling can be beneficial to you as a buyer. It can even potentially save you some money. Here are 4 reasons to buy a home in the winter.

There are plenty of homes on the market in winter.

We’ve said it before: with technology, there is no off-season for real estate. In fact, “almost a million homes were sold in the US last winter (973,000 from Dec 2018-February 2019).” So there will be plenty of great homes available to buyers during the winter months.

While the quantity may be lower than the spring/summer market, you will still have great options available to you.

You’ll have fewer offers to compete with.

Winter weather keeps some buyers away from the market until the snow and ice has melted. This means there will be lower demand and fewer buyers to make offers.

We aren’t saying you’ll be the only person to place an offer on a home, but you may find yourself in a smaller pool of offers. This can work to your advantage and keep you from engaging in a costly bidding war.

You’ll see how the home holds up in bad weather.

It is easier to inspect the exterior of a home in the spring or summer. But winter will show how well the home performs in snow, sleet, ice, and cold. You’ll be able to see leaks, discover how the insulation performs, and find any heating problems.

Motivated sellers could help save you money.

Many homes listed in the winter because of a major life change. And while this doesn’t mean you’ll get a home for a severe discount, it may save you a few dollars. According to Trulia, buyers saved, “an average [discount] of 6.1% on home prices, the highest discount through the year.”


While it may be a cold outside, the real estate market is still hot! If you’re ready to start looking for your home now, check out homes for sale page to see all of the great homes available now.


First-Time Homebuyers: Don’t Make These Mistakes!

Have you heard? January is the new April! The spring market is kicking off unusually early this year, so if you’re a first-time home buyer you may be starting the home buying process earlier than expected. If you’re ready to start your house HUNT, here are a few common first-time homebuyer mistakes to avoid:


Looking outside of your price range.

man signing paperwork on a table

When you view homes online, it can be tempting to look at all the homes available without a price range in mind. But if you look at homes that are unattainable, you could fall in love with a home that you can’t afford. Think you can afford to stretch your budget to the max? Consider that while you may think you’re just spending an extra $10K, “…you’re paying an extra $10,000 plus interest (Investopia.com).” Carefully consider how much you can stretch your budget before you start looking so you don’t end up in a home you can’t afford.

Skipping your neighborhood research

blue front porch with seating

You’ll want to do some research on the neighborhoods you are looking at. Look into the neighborhood, and ask yourself important questions like:

  • What can of development plans are in the works? 
  • What are the zoning laws? If there is a lot of open land, what could be built on it?
  • Have home values in the area been on the rise or decline?
  • Is this a safe neighborhood during the day and night? (drive around at different times of the day)
  • Is this home on a main street? Will it get a lot of traffic? 

Getting caught in a bidding war

Couple with smart phone smiling

You find a house you love. The problem? So do 5 other people. While it can be easy to get into a bidding war, you may end up offering significantly more than a home is worth. This can become a major problem for anyone financing their home purchase. If you’re relying on a mortgage and the bank doesn’t appraise the house at or above the amount you offered, you may be coughing up a lot more money. And the worst-case scenario: your deal may fall through.

Make sure you know what the home is worth and how much you can afford before entering a bidding war. Your agent can be a great asset to inform you about the home’s value so you know when you should stay and when you should walk away.

Skipping out on an agent

Using a real estate agent to assist you in your home buying process is a great idea. In fact, 89% of homebuyers in 2019 said they used a real estate agent for their home buying transaction.

We always suggest that you do your research to find an agent or team to assist you. You want to be deliberate with your agent choice because your success or failure could depend on them. They handle a large portion of your home buying process. Don’t ever work with an agent that does not fit your needs. Make a list of recommended agents and look them up online. See what previous customers have said, what areas they specialize in, and what they can offer you. 


With the right agent to guide you, you can attack this “early” spring market with ease! Contact a HUNT Real Estate Sales Professional today if you’re ready to start your House HUNT.